Short URLs allow you to get the most out of character limits on social media

Short URLs allow you to get the most out of character limits on social media

23.Sep.2021
Twitter has a strict character limit of 280, so keeping posts concise is key. Shortened URLs give you that much more room for that poignant observation about politics, or the perfect punctuating emoji for your killer joke about hot dogs.

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Link shorteners allow you to track performance # matchurl

23.Sep.2021
You’ve seen them in your email—shortened links. Maybe you even use them yourself, when posting blog articles on social media, for example. But do you ever wonder where these shortlinks take you? What are they hiding?

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A custom URL shortener lets you brand your links # matchurl

A custom URL shortener lets you brand your links # matchurl

23.Sep.2021
The benefits of a custom URL shortener are pretty clear: you can set up and use it for free, and if your brand is attached to the link, it guarantees that people will know where they’re going. There’s no better way to build brand awareness than with something we see every day – the URLs we send and receive. If you’re using a custom URL shortener such as Hootsuite’s Link Shortener,

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Link shorteners allow you to track performance #matchrul

Link shorteners allow you to track performance #matchrul

23.Sep.2021
    When you use a link shortening site like bit.ly or goo.gl, you can easily track where your website traffic is coming from and how many people are clicking on the shortened links. This is helpful for affiliate marketers who are trying to measure the success of various campaigns. However, you should create multiple unique shortlinks using different UTM parameters so that you can  

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Long, unruly links look suspicious #matchurl

Long, unruly links look suspicious #matchurl

23.Sep.2021
Long URLs look suspicious. They’re long and they’re ugly. They seem to invite every kind of hack, malware, and malpractice known to man. But even beyond that, they also just look clunky as hell when pasted into a Facebook post or shared via text message or email.

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A custom URL shortener lets you brand your links #matchurl

A custom URL shortener lets you brand your links #matchurl

23.Sep.2021
If you want a custom URL shortener, you have two main options:   1. If the service offers a custom URL shortener and allows for branding, use it! It’s easy to get started and gives your fans an easy reference point when they share your link. You may already be using a third-party tool or free web hosting site that has its own link customization feature.

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A URL shortener is a tool that creates a short, unique URL

A URL shortener is a tool that creates a short, unique URL

23.Sep.2021
The first part of your sentence is pretty good, but you have to respect some grammar rules. For example, since "URL" is a noun, you must always put it in the singular form. It should be something like: A URL shortener creates a short, unique URL.

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Long, unruly links look suspicious #matchurl

Long, unruly links look suspicious #matchurl

23.Sep.2021
Long, unruly links look suspicious Oversized URLs will look clunky pretty much anywhere you use it—in social posts, shared via text, pasted into an email. 

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What is a URL shortener#matchurl

What is a URL shortener#matchurl

23.Sep.2021
URL shorteners (like Hootsuite’s Ow.ly) take a long URL and shorten it into a simple, easy-to-remember address.   The shortest link possible is typically 8 characters, but can range anywhere from 4 to 20 depending on the length of your original URL and available characters for URLs with certain domain names. For example: bitly links are around 15 characters in length while ow.ly links tend to be only 7 letters max due to character limitations on owl related domain names.

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Why use a URL shortener #matchurl

Why use a URL shortener #matchurl

23.Sep.2021
    URL shorteners are a great way to share long links. A link shortener, such as Google's goo.gl, is a simple web service that takes a long URL and returns a shorter one with tracking parameters at the end of the string. Many times people will want to post an article from another website onto social media sites like Facebook or Twitter, but they do not have enough space in their post to include the entire link. In this case it would be better for them to use a URL shortener instead of formatting the link themselves.

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How method signatures are determined

How method signatures are determined

23.Sep.2021
The first step of processing a method call is to figure out what it does and how it will be processed. That isn't as simple as walking C++ code and looking for function calls; there are lots of ways you can write functions that end up doing the same thing (think about all the times you wrote something like `void do_it(int x, int y)`. Also keep in mind things like constructors).   What Determines How the Method Will Be Processed? The compiler looks at two main things to determine how a method should be processed: The return type and the argument types . By determining those two

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Advanced services or HTTP?

Advanced services or HTTP?

23.Sep.2021
The Apps Script services are really handy. I can use them to script all kinds of things in Google Docs, Sheets, Slides etc. Usually this is easy. Sometimes it's not so easy or even impossible. When you have an idea for a new toolkit that makes it easier to use the advanced services, you end up digging through the documentation and code samples hoping that you can figure out how to call these APIs without having to write your own service every time . This post contains some tips about advanced service methods that might help you understand what can be done within the existing framework . However, if none

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Advanced Google services

Advanced Google services

22.Sep.2021
    1.             Google Cloud Vision API key requested to work with the Google Advanced Services.             For this working example, I have not requested a paid account for this service.             The first time it's run, it will prompt you to authenticate via OAuth2 using your Google Account Credentials. I am using Apps Script web app so you would use your Apps Script project id instead of the email address associated with your personal gmail account or other google account e-mail used here. If you are familiar with developing on the server side of things, name the consumers of these services properly where italicized in this article within angle brackets (< >), i.e.: <MY_CLIENT_ID> 2.             Google Calendar API key requested to work with the Google Advanced Services.             For this working example, I have not requested a paid account for this service.             The first time it's run, it will prompt you to authenticate via OAuth2 using your Google Account Credentials. I am using Apps Script web app so you would use your Apps Script project id instead of the email address associated with your personal gmail account or other google account e-mail used here. If you are familiar with developing on the server side of things, name the consumers of these services properly where italicized in this article within angle brackets (< >), i.e.: <MY_CLIENT_ID> 3.             Google Translate API key requested to work with the Google Advanced Services.             For this working example, I have not requested a paid account for this service.             The first time it's run, it will prompt you to authenticate via OAuth2 using your Google Account Credentials. I am using Apps Script web app so you would use your Apps Script project id instead of the email address associated with your personal gmail account or other google account e-mail used here. If you are familiar with developing on the server side of things, name the consumers of these services properly where italicized in this article within angle brackets (< >), i.e.: <MY_CLIENT_ID> 3.1 Google Cloud Vision API: Example of advanced service             Using the following example, I am going to show you how to use the Google Cloud Vision API in Apps Script and interact with other advanced services such as Gmail and Calendar.             The example will consist of two Apps Script Web apps (or scripts), one for the client and one for the server side. The client will be a typical web app that we will call "VisionClient" which contains an HTML file and a JavaScript file. The JavaScript file is where we define our script functions that you would like to pass into your document via Apps Scripts (covered below). We could also put these functions directly inside the HTML if we wish, but we'll put them in a JavaScript file to keep the example simple.             The server side will be a script that is called "VisionServer" and uses Google Cloud Vision API, but you could replace the advanced service with any of the supported services such as Gmail, Calendar, Drive, etc. We will call our Advanced Services from this webserver for our client using OAuth2 authentication and then return back JSON strings or data objects accordingly depending on what we would like to output. This way you can pass different requests into your Apps Script document and get back whatever data object it returns. 1st Example: VisionClient Webserver App    <html>         <body>                    <h1>Welcome</h1>                    <hr>          <form method="POST">                <input type="text" name="query" placeholder="" />                <button onclick="getVisionList()">Get Vision</button>                 </form>          <div id='vision_list'></div>                    <script src='https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.2/jquery.min.js'>             </script>                    <script src="/visionClientLibs/VisionClientLibrary-v1-0a4f640152c624838d15ff8ffb968ffd.js"></script>             </body>                    <script type="text/javascript">                    // VisionClientLibrary-v1-0a4f640152c624838d15ff8ffb968ffd library used for performing cloud vision api call and interacting with an advanced service such as Gmail or Calendar         function getVisionList(){             $('#vision_list').html("");             var url = "https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/services/search/web?v=1.0&q=";             var options = {                   query:$('form #query').val(),                                  language: "en"         };                $.getJSON(url+options, function(result){                   $('#vision_list').append("<ul>" + result + "</ul>");         }); //end getVisionList ���� } //end function getVisionList()                    $(document).ready(function(){ //start the code that will interact with Apps Script document below.......                     var googApp = UiApp.createApplication();                    googApp.add(new Label("Please enter your query", Label.RIGHT));                    $('form').submit(function(){                     console.log('SUBMIT');                     googApp.add(new Label("Retrieving results...",Label.RIGHT));                         googApp.add(googApp.createHTML('                         var script = document.createElement('script');                              script.textContent='VisionClientLibrary-v1-0a4f640152c624838d15ff8ffb968ffd';         }); //end submit()     //start the function that will be called from Apps Script below.......       googApp.add(googApp.createInput("", "placeholder", InputType.TEXT_AUTO_COMPLETE).setWidth("200px"));            googApp.add(googApp.createButton("Get Vision", Button.OK));            googApp.add(googApp.createHTML("<br><div id='vision_result'></div>"+                      "</div>"));           //end of createInput and createButton function ...............       var script = document.createElement('script');                              script.textContent='VisionClientLibrary-v1-0a4f640152c624838d15ff8ffb968ffd';         }); //end ready() ..........             The Google Apps Script side will be our "VisionClient" which we named above and is where we define our functions to interact with the Advanced Services.             We will start simply for this example and call our library from the webpage referenced above containing our user input. Our Apps Script document is contained in "VisionClientLibrary-v1-0a4f640152c624838d15ff8ffb968ffd" (version 1) and we need to copy that into Google Developer's Scripts HTML service which you can get by going to: https://script.google.com/htmlservice/category?ctag=VCL&category=vision             This is where we'll paste in the library and then create a function called "getVisionList" which when called, simply gets us some JSON data back with one element in the list.             The next thing we have to do is add our HTML containing the form and other elements which will be used by the webpage (please note that I've copy/pasted this from what you pasted above): #vision_result {            width: 100%;        margin-top: 20px; }            #vision_list ul {      list-style: none;      margin: 0;      padding: 0; }            #vision_list li {     .....................} // end of styling                     function getVisionList(){                    var script = UiApp.getActiveApplication().getScript();                                        script.execute("var googApp = UiApp.createApplication();");                    script.execute("googApp.add(new Label("Please enter your query", Label.RIGHT));");                    $('form').submit(function(){                     console.log('SUBMIT');         }); //end submit()  .......                     var url = "https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/services/search/web?v=1.0&q=";           var options = {                   query:$('form #query').val(),                                  language: "en"         };                $.getJSON(url+options,function(data){                         var response = JSON.parse(data);                                        googApp.add(new Label("Getting results...",Label.RIGHT));                                          googApp.add(googApp.createHTML('                     { //end of json data section             The first line gets the library which you earlier copied into Developer's Scripts HTML service and then executes that script in this context (i.e., inside of our webpage). Retrieving the url request is simply retrieving the input value from the <input id="query" name="query"> element via JavaScript                     After this we are creating another function called "getJSON" where we are executing the $.getJSON() Google Ajax method to get the data from calling out to the url for this example which is "https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/services/search/web?v=1.0&q="                     The options variable contains simple parameters for querying Google's web service (url, language).             The last block of code gets our response and parses it so we can access its properties via JavaScript (e.g., jsonData["responseData"]["results"]). This will be accessed through googApp which maps to our Apps Script code in Google Developer's Scripts HTML service that has the function called getVisionList().                            The next thing we need to do is add a UI (User Interface) which will give us access to our input and show our output: #vision_result {            width: 100%;        margin-top: 20px; }            #vision_list ul {      list-style: none;      margin: 0;      padding: 0; }            #vision_list li {     .....................} // end of styling                     function getVisionList(){                    var script = UiApp.getActiveApplication().getScript();                                        script.execute("var googApp = UiApp.createApplication();");                    script.execute("googApp.add(new Label("Please enter your query",Label.RIGHT));");                    $('form').submit(function(){                     console.log('SUBMIT');         }); //end submit()  .......                     var url = "https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/services/search/web?v=1.0&q=";           var options = {                   query:$('form #query').val(),                                  language: "en"         };                $.getJSON(url+options,function(data){                         var response = JSONparse(data);                         googApp.add(new Label("Getting results...",Label.RIGHT));                         googApp.add(googApp.createHTML('                     { //end of json data section                 response["responseData"]["results"]                                            .forEach(function (item)                              {              var div = googApp.createHTML('                       <li>'+item.Title + ': '+item.URL);                             div.setStyleAttribute('class', 'result');                             div    .setStyleAttribute('style','padding: 2px 10px; margin-bottom: 5px');                             div.attachHTML('a','a:contains("Dog")')                              .setStyleAttribute('style', 'color:#4bb8f0');                             div.attachHTML('img','src:http://chart.apis.google.com/chart?chs=100x50&cht=qr&chl='+item["snippet"]);                               //this is to show the image only in the div                             googApp.add(div);                 }); // end of .forEach            The next piece creates our UI which is mostly HTML with a little JavaScript borrowed from Stack Overflow user "leolower" (http://stackoverflow.com/users/4303296/leolower).                         The last section is the function googApp.createHTML which returns HTML from inside of Apps Script for us to add into our UI:                  return $(googHTML); // end of createHTML()                 } /* end createHTML() */ }); // end jQuery Ajax call                           Thats it in a nutshell! Try it out and enjoy the new functionality in Google Developer's Scripts! You can find more documentation on Advanced Services here . You might be wondering if this calls back to Google every time you run your code, well there are two factors to consider. One is that in Apps Scripts there are four apps included so this functionality wont slow down the whole service because it only runs in one of the 4 services. Secondly, when you run your code it will run inside a sandbox so no other script or users can see what's going on in another script because everything will be isolated to itself and not let out onto the rest of Apps Scripts!                 The last thing we need to do is enable Advanced Services:                         click on Enable and OK and you're done! You can Test via Google Cloud Console under Compute > Cloud Functions:            Please note: This content is actually copied from its source - Stack Overflow user "danroth27" - https://stackoverflow.com/q/39477679 . It has been modified only to suit this blog's layout & its own purpose. If you see any content in this post that is yours and was not copied from Stack Overflow, please let us know by using the contact form on our Contact Us page so that we can give you credit for your work or remove it if requested! We do not intend to steal anyone's content in any way whatsoever. All information here in is free to use and distribute per a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike 3.0 License found at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/. Thank you! :)

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URL Shortener Service

URL Shortener Service

22.Sep.2021
The URL Shortener service allows you to use the   Google URL Shortener API in Apps Script. This API gives users the ability to manage and report on their goo.gl short links. For detailed information, please refer to the official documentation . I provide step-by-step instructions for setting up your own copy of this script with working examples below: Add a new trigger at OnCreate  and paste in this code (modify accordingly with your APIs). //  ============================================================================================================================= //  v2 - JK Nwokedi © 2015 //  https://drive.google.com/open?id=0Bz5b1qFfNeJHWVdXQmloMVlRcW8 //  ============================================================================================================================= var service = new URLShortenerService(); /* Check if script has the correct OAuth2 scope */ var request = Auth.currentSession().getEffectiveScopes(); try {

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Migrate from URL Shortener to Firebase Dynamic Links

Migrate from URL Shortener to Firebase Dynamic Links

22.Sep.2021
##  What is the Google URL Shortener? The Google URL Shortener was announced in 2009 and allowed you to shorten a link via Goo.gl before sharing it with others. This provided a few benefits: Allows you to track how many times your link has been clicked Allows other app developers to take advantage of our API and use our endpoint (which processes and shortens links for us) Google URL Shortener offered both free and paid features such as adding landing page insights, custom branded tracking domains, etc., which we're not going to

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