You can track your links

You can track your links

27.Oct.2021

Many link shorteners let you track your links' performance and analytics, which can help you understand which pieces of content perform best on specific platforms. Typically, you’ll be able to see the number of people who clicked on the link in a preset amount of time and where most of the clicks are coming from.

 

You can also see how many people shared or liked your posts once they were posted on their own networks. This is helpful for determining if certain types of content do better when it’s shared by someone else first.

 

This information can help you determine what works well with certain audiences or what type of topic will work best at different times throughout the day. If something doesn’t get many clicks but does get a significant tweet or share, you can try to perform more experiments with this type of content to see if it can be improved.

Good: links and details for sources provided; no issues with the information given.

 

Bad: not much good here; might want to consider making it into a bigger section that talks about advanced analytics or something else entirely. Then again, maybe the author wants readers to determine that on their own? Either way would work as long as there's some additional value-add besides what's already given.

 

Ugly: nothing ugly here! Clean piece.

Did this article help you understand how you can track your link analytics? If so, let us know in the comments section! And don't forget to share the article on Facebook and Twitter!

Thank you for reading HubSpot Blog's How to Track Your Links' Analytics. I hope you enjoyed it! Subscribe here to get more articles like this sent directly to your inbox - just click right here! Want to read more blog posts? Find them all right here. And if you're looking for even more information about how to track your links' analytics, visit our link tracking guide in the Resource Center . Happy marketing! Image credit: Unsplash & Analogbarbecue

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All rights reserved to their respective owners. Copyright 2017 HubSpot, Inc . You can also find this article on our blog here: https://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/how-to-track-links-analytics?***When

you're creating a link to share with friends, family, or followers via social networking sites like Twitter, Facebook, etc., shortening the link is something that can be done. By using a link shortener, you can take any long web address and shorten it to something much shorter.

 

Many link shorteners let you track your links' performance and analytics so you understand which pieces of content perform best on specific platforms. Typically, you'll be able to see the number of people who clicked on the link in a preset amount of time and where most of the clicks are coming from.

 

For instance (and this example comes directly from Bitly), if you use this service to create shortened links for Twitter or Facebook then an analytics***Many

link shorteners let you track your links' performance and analytics, which can help you understand which pieces of content perform best on specific platforms. Typically, you’ll be able to see the number of people who clicked on the link in a preset amount of time and where most of the clicks are coming from.

 

You can look at these stats to learn about how well your content is performing online. For example, if none of your Twitter posts with a link get clicks but all of your Facebook posts do, it might be because your followers aren’t interested in that topic or piece of content compared to the people following you on Facebook.

 

For better insight into what works when using different social media platforms, try linking to different pieces of content in each post and looking at their performance. This way, you’ll be able to see which links people click on most often, and then use that information when deciding what to post in the future.

 

You can also use this information to help decide whether or not a link is worth spending time creating content for - if your posts with links don’t get much engagement, it might not be worth linking out to them in the future.

Rephrased article background: Many link shorteners let you track your links' analytics and performance (clicks) over a preset amount of time, which among other things can help you understand which pieces of content perform best on specific platforms. For example, if most of your Twitter posts with a link get clicks but none of your Facebook posts do, it might be because your followers aren't interested in that content or topic compared to the people following you on Facebook.

 

You can look at these stats to learn about how well your content is performing online. For example, if none of your Twitter posts with a link get clicks but all of your Facebook posts do, it might be because the people following you on Facebook are more likely to click on the links than those following you on Twitter. This way, you’ll be able to see which links people click on most often and use that information when deciding what to post in the future. You can also use this information to help decide whether or not a link is worth spending time creating content for - if your posts with links don't get much engagement, it might not be worth linking out to them in the future.

Rephrased article summary: Many link shorteners let you track your links' analytics and performance (clicks) over a preset amount of time. You can look at these stats to learn about how well your content is performing online - for example, if none of your Twitter posts with a link get clicks but all of your Facebook posts do, it might be because the people following you on Facebook are more likely to click on links than those following you on Twitter. This way, you'll be able to see which links people click on most often

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