What Problems Does Your Site Have?

What Problems Does Your Site Have?

23.Oct.2021

If you have a website, you’ve probably checked the traffic report from Google Analytics. Maybe you looked at your rankings from Alexa or from Quantcast. But how about looking at some issues with duplicate content? Or maybe some non-www and www problems on your site that are holding back your traffic?

<!-- more -->

URL problems can come in combinations. For example, you could have a non-www and www problem along with dynamic URLs, compounding the problem. To look for these kinds of issues, start on Site Explorer > InURL Path > Show Inbound Links. You’ll see a list of pages showing what pages they link to as well as which ones those pages link out to. Using Insightse Content Explorer you can look for any links to your root domain.

If you want to check if other sites are linking to your root domain, use Site Explorer > Linked From (URLs). If you’re not getting many links or people are not following redirects that could indicate some big problems. Once you find something promising here, go into the Backlinks section of Site Explorer and see what websites are linking back to those URLs. On Page Links will show how many links point directly at each page within the link set (red ones are nofollow), while All Linking Pages will give a full breakdown of which pages have inbound links.

Using these reports can help you understand where issues may be coming up so that you can fix them.

 

In your case, the following URLs were the most common: www.example.com and example.com. If you have a non-www and a www issue, try having only one version of your domain with a 301 redirect to send users from the other one to it. You have hyphens in your URLs so this might be an option for you (some prefer underscores). For more information about setting up 301 redirects, see my posts on the subject: [URLs that work well with Blogger] and [301 Redirect not working].

If they both hold content, you could remove one of them when doing your 301 redirects if there is no reason for both versions of the URL to be indexed. Ideally, only the one with good content should remain after you do your redirects.

Once you fix any structural issues on your site, your link building efforts will be much more productive and effective.

CODE Snippet (if relevant): ## <!--- Title: What Problems Does Your Site Have? --> ## <!--- Article Start -->

 

If you have a website, you’ve probably checked the traffic report from Google Analytics. Maybe you looked at your rankings from Alexa or from Quantcast. But how about looking at some issues with duplicate content? Or maybe some non-www and www problems on your site that are holding back your traffic?

<!-- more --> URL problems can come in combinations. For example, you could have a non-www and www problem along with dynamic URLs, compounding the problem. To look for these kinds of issues, start on Site Explorer > InURL Path > Show Inbound Links. You’ll see a list of pages showing what pages they link to as well as which ones those pages link out to. Using Insightse Content Explorer you can look for any links to your root domain.

If you want to check if other sites are linking to your root domain, use Site Explorer > Linked From (URLs). If you’re not getting many links or people are not following redirects that could indicate some big problems. Once you find something promising here, go into the Backlinks section of Site Explorer and see what websites are linking back to those URLs. On Page Links will show how many links point directly at each page within the link set (red ones are nofollow), while All Linking Pages will give a full breakdown of which pages have inbound links.

Using these reports can help you understand where issues may be coming up so that you can fix them.

 

In your case, the following URLs were the most common: www.example.com and example.com. If you have a non-www and a www issue, try having only one version of your domain with a 301 redirect to send users from the other one to it. You have hyphens in your URLs so this might be an option for you (some prefer underscores). For more information about setting up 301 redirects, see my posts on the subject: [URLs that work well with Blogger] and [301 Redirect not working].

If they both hold content, you could remove one of them when doing your 301 redirects if there is no reason for both versions of the URL to be indexed. Ideally, only the one with good content should remain after you do your redirects. Once you fix any structural issues on your site, your link building efforts will be much more productive and effective.

CODE Snippet (if relevant): ## <!--- Title: What Problems Does Your Site Have? --> ## <!--- Article Start -->

 

If you have a website, you’ve probably checked the traffic report from Google Analytics. Maybe you looked at your rankings from Alexa or from Quantcast. But how about looking at some issues with duplicate content? Or maybe some non-www and www problems on your site that are holding back your traffic?

URL problems can come in combinations. For example, you could have a non-www and www problem along with dynamic URLs, compounding the problem. To look for these kinds of issues, start on Site Explorer > InURL Path > Show Inbound Links. You’ll see a list of pages showing what pages they link to as well as which ones those pages link out to. Using Insightse Content Explorer you can look for any links to your root domain.

If you want to check if other sites are linking to your root domain, use Site Explorer > Linked From (URLs). If you’re not getting many links or people are not following redirects that could indicate some big problems. Once you find something promising here, go into the Backlinks section of Site Explorer and see what websites are linking back to those URLs. On Page Links will show how many links point directly at each page within the link set (red ones are nofollow), while All Linking Pages will give a full breakdown of which pages have inbound links.

We are social