What Exactly is a “URL”?

What Exactly is a “URL”?

06.Oct.2021

URL stands for “Uniform Resource Locator,” and they’re a way of identifying the location of a file on the internet.

URLs are useful because they allow you to determine where online files are located. This is Yahoo’s main page; it tells us exactly where the file is located (on Yahoo’s servers) and what specific file we want (in this case, index.html). If we wanted something different – say, an image – we could simply change the end of that URL to specify any other type of image1.html, image2.jpg, etcetera.

URLs can be as long as they need to be – there’s no set limit – but the only those who see them are those who have access to the file or anyone you choose to share it with. URLs are not the same as domain names. Domain names are the words after the period, They describe where the file is located on the internet, so they exist alongside URLs rather than supplanting them.

 

Is a URL the same as a domain name?

No, although you might sometimes see them used interchangeably or in conjunction with one another. A domain name tells you where your website is located; it’s essentially another way of identifying where files are online (for example, Yahoo!’s domain name is “www.yahoo.com”). You can also use web addresses without typing in any suffixes (basically typing www before anything else), but there are usually multiple sites corresponding to the same domain name (for example, Google’s domain name is “www.google.com” but if you type in www.googlr.com instead, you still end up at the same place).

though both URLs lead to Wikipedia’s servers and specify the pages for those servers’ English-language articles on Wikipedia (the first specifies an individual article, while the second specifies all English language articles).

If you wanted to access Google’s servers for your image search

 

URL stands for “Uniform Resource Locator” and they are a way of identifying the location of a file on the internet. URLs are useful because they allow users to determine where online files are located. For example, Yahoo!’s main page tells us exactly where the file is located (on Yahoo’s servers) and what specific file we want (in this case, index.html). This means that if we wanted something different – say, an image – we could simply change the end of that URL to specify any other type of image1.html, image2.jpg, etcetera. URLs can be as long as they need to be – there’s no set limit – but only those who see them are those who have access to the file or anyone you choose to share it with. URLs are not the same as domain names although they do coexist alongside one another and sometimes with use of one in conjunction with the other. Domain names describe where your website is located and essentially identify where files are online (for example, Yahoo!’s domain name is www.yahoo.com). You can also use web addresses without typing in any suffixes (basically typing www before anything else), but there are usually multiple sites corresponding to the same domain name (for example, Google’s domain name is www.google.com but if you type in www.googlr.com instead, you still end up at the same place).

 

No, although you might sometimes see them used interchangeably or in conjunction with one another. A domain name tells you where your website is located; it’s essentially another way of identifying where files are online (for example, Yahoo!’s domain name is “www.yahoo.com”). You can also use web addresses without typing in any suffixes (basically typing www before anything else), but there are usually multiple sites corresponding to the same domain name (for example, Google’s domain name is “www.google.com” but if you type in www.googlr.com instead, you still end up at the same place).

 

Though both URLs lead to Wikipedia’s servers and specify the pages for those servers’ English-language articles on Wikipedia (the first specifies an individual article, while the second specifies all English language articles).

 

 

We are social