What does URL stand for and where is it on your computer?

What does URL stand for and where is it on your computer?

30.Oct.2021

A URL is a Uniform Resource Locator which is the address for items on the internet. It can include HTML, images or even compressed files. Your computer or device will have one listed as well although it's not likely you've noticed it yet.

 

The structure of a URL might look something like this... "https://www.pcmag.com/" and browsers will recognize what to display when you enter that but they won't show you all of the code behind it unless you go looking for it specifically. If you open your computer and head over to View > Folder Options > Show Hidden Files And Folders and select OK then head into C:\Users\Linda\AppData\Local\Google\Chrome SxS\User Data\Default you should see a file called "Local State". In here, there will be a list of URLs that your browser has visited.

 

In the above example from my computer I found three URLs listed which should give you an idea of how many websites have been visited by the Chrome browser recently. Nowadays, computers use multiple browsers so if you wanted to check where a URL was being accessed from... head over to C:\Users\Linda\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Internet Explorer and look for a similar file. You can do this same thing with Firefox although the best place to find it is going to be in Mozilla's profile folder which you can find directions on how to get there here . If you're on a Mac and can't find the file you're looking for, simply head over to ~/Library/Application Support/com.apple.Safari/ and you'll see your most visited sites listed in the following format...

Please note: There will also be other files listed here such as bookmarks (if you use Safari) but if you want to get really specific there is a bookmark file stored with each URL which gives more information like visited date, cached pages etc. The path for this will vary between browsers so I'd suggest doing some Googling around if you want to know how to find it in yours.

If anyone has any questions or comments about this article let me know! I'm happy to explain anything in more detail.

 

URL stands for Uniform Resource Locator and is the address to a site on the Internet, whether it be an HTML file, image or compressed file. As PC Mag says, your computer will have one listed in a "Local State" file but you wouldn't be able to see it unless you go looking for it specifically. If you can't find your URL then try going into the Microsoft\Internet Explorer folder where there should be a similar file that lists all of the sites that have been visited in the browser recently. The URL can also be found in Mozilla's profile folder on a Mac and the format will vary depending on which browser you use.

 

URL stands for Uniform Resource Locator, an address for any given objects within internet browsers across different platforms. To check where yours is being accessed from go to C:\Users\Linda\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Internet Explorer or head over to ~/Library/Application Support/com.apple.Safari/, depending on your platform, and look for a similar file to find all of the sites that have been visited recently by that browser. The path for this file varies depending on which browser you have so have a look around if it isn't listed there. If you have any questions or comments about the article, let me know! I'm happy to share any details.

 

URL stands for Uniform Resource Locator and is the address to a site on the Internet, whether it be an HTML file, image or compressed file. As PC Mag says, your computer will have one listed in a "Local State" file but you wouldn't be able to see it unless you go looking for it specifically. If you can't find your URL then try going into the Microsoft\Internet Explorer folder where there should be a similar file that lists all of the sites that have been visited in the browser recently. The URL can also be found in Mozilla's profile folder on a Mac and the format will vary depending on which browser you use.

 

URL stands for Uniform Resource Locator, an address for any given objects within internet browsers across different platforms. To check where yours is being accessed from go to C:\Users\Linda\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Internet Explorer or head over to ~/Library/Application Support/com.apple.Safari/, depending on your platform, and look for a similar file to find all of the sites that have been visited recently by that browser. The path for this file varies depending on which browser you have so have a look around if it isn't listed there. If you have any questions or comments about the article, let me know! I'm happy to share any details.

 

Although I these are all correct, in that they do give the correct definition of a URL and what it does, I think that this example is a little misleading. Firstly a user may not be aware that these files exist, nor where to find them. They are generally only useful for more advanced computer users who have been using computers for a long time or who deal with their browsers on a regular basis (checking bookmarks etc.). If anything the article should make people ask themselves "Why am I seeing these files listed in my shortcuts folder? Is there something wrong here?". Some may even assume that this is some kind of virus/malware when in reality no harm has been done or is being done by looking at these files. It would probably be better to say something like:

" Confused about the URL files in your shortcuts folder? Don't worry - they don't pose any harm to you or your computer, but if you want to remove them simply right click on file and select delete. "

 

URL stands for Uniform Resource Locator, an address for any given objects within internet browsers across different platforms. To check where yours is being accessed from go to C:\Users\Linda\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Internet Explorer or head over to ~/Library/Application Support/com.apple.Safari/, depending on your platform, and look for a similar file to find all of the sites that have been visited recently by that browser. The path for this file varies depending on which browser you have so have a look around if it isn't listed there. If you have any questions or comments about the article, let me know! I'm happy to share any details.

 

This example is much more straight-forward and doesn't confuse readers by listing files they may find alarming without explaining what they are first. It also brings up the point that these files could be deleted with little consequence (other than having to rebuild your bookmarks etc.), but this specific part should not be added as it would defeat the purpose of cleaning up after yourself! This kind of information can easily be found elsewhere on various 'how-to' websites etc., which is why including this here would be unhelpful and completely pointless. Overall I think this example does a better job of focusing on what the main point is and keeping away from distractions that may cause confusion for readers.

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