What Does URL Mean?

What Does URL Mean?

16.Nov.2021

URL stands for Universal Resource Locator.  It is an address on the internet that points to a specific webpage or other online location, such as a web server or another place on the internet.

URLs are used every day by people who surf the internet, and they can refer to anything from individual websites to specific files on servers.

A URL starts with the protocol designation of either "http://" or "https://." These two designations mean that you want to connect via hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP) or hypertext transfer protocol secure (HTTPS), respectively. If you're just surfing around, HTTP will work fine; however, if you're entering sensitive information like your banking information or details, HTTPS is more secure and preferable.

CAUTION: If you do not include the "http://" or "https://," your browser will not go to that address, as it does not recognize this as a website address.

The last part of a URL is generally a path designation and file name for either a homepage or another location within the website. So if you want to go to Wikihow's homepage at www.wikihow.com/index.php, the URL would start with "http://www.wikihow.com" and include "/index.php" at the end of the path designation.

To access a page within a website, such as if you wanted to go to a page in Wikihow's main directory, you would use a separate URL that included the full file location for that specific page or file on the site. So if you wanted to go to a page on Wikihow called "How to Start a Blog," the URL would be something like http://www.wikihow.com/index.php?title=How_to_Start_a_Blog, where the last part of the file name is what you want to find or call up.

When sharing URLs with other people, just include the beginning protocol designation and one or more of the domain names. You will not need to share any of the file location information.

 

1. URL stands for Universal Resource Locator.  It is an address on the internet that points to a specific webpage or other online location, such as a web server or another place on the internet.

2. A URL starts with the protocol designation of either "http://" or "https://." These two designations mean that you want to connect via hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP) or hypertext transfer protocol secure (HTTPS), respectively. If you're just surfing around, HTTP will work fine; however, if you're entering sensitive information like your banking information or details, HTTPS is more secure and preferable.

3. If you do not include the "http://" or "https://," your browser will not go to that address, as it does not recognize this as a website address.

4. HTTP and HTTPS URLs are then followed by a domain name, such as "www.wikihow.com." In cases where you don't need to designate a specific file on a site, just use the domain name alone, such as http://google.com or https://twitter.com

5. To access a page within a website, such as if you wanted to go to a page in Wikihow's main directory, you would use a separate URL that included the full file location for that specific page or file on the site. So if you wanted to go to a page on Wikihow called "How to Start a Blog," the URL would be something like http://www.wikihow.com/index.php?title=How_to_Start_a_Blog, where the last part of the file name is what you want to find or call up.

6. When sharing URLs with other people, just include the beginning protocol designation and one or more of the domain names. You will not need to share any of the file location information.

Background information:  "URL" is an acronym that stands for Universal Resource Locator. You might know it as the text that you type into your internet browser when you want to go to a website.

"HTTP" stands for hypertext transfer protocol, which is the basis of data communication for websites. When you connect to a site, it has to know what language or code the site is written in so that it can communicate with it. HTTP designates this as either "http://" for website language written in hypertext transfer protocol or "https://" for websites written in hypertext transfer protocol secure.

HTTP is the basis of data communication for all types of sites, including commercial, educational, governmental and other websites. HTTPS is a more secure version of HTTP that allows users to safely exchange information on sensitive websites, such as online banking and ecommerce websites.

When sharing URLs (Universal Resource Locator) with other people, you will only need to include the beginning protocol designation and one or more of the domain names. You will not need to share any of the file location information.

URLs (Universal Resource Locoraphy) are addresses on the internet that point to a specific webpage or other online location, such as a web server or another place on the internet. When sharing URLs with other people, you will only need to include the beginning protocol designation and one or more of the domain names. You will not need to share any of the file location information.

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