Track all the clicks, see how things change over time

Track all the clicks, see how things change over time

11.Sep.2021

Dear Lifehacker,

I'm trying to track my links, but I don't know how. How can I see when each of them was clicked?

Sincerely,

Curious About Stats  

Dear Curious About Stats,

Tracking your links is important for a number of reasons. Maybe you're trying to measure the effectiveness of an ad campaign; maybe you're checking up on sales from one link or another; or maybe you want to check that nobody's going around and spamming your links with no-follow tags everywhere. Whatever the case may be, there are a few ways to go about tracking those clicks—and we've outlined a few below! While Google does offer a way to track this information in Analytics, it's not great—especially if you're using a link shortener (like bit.ly, for example). If that describes your situation, read on!

Shorten the article summaries with some sort of relevant keyword so readers can review what was said without having to re-read it all.

 

Background information about links + how-to guide for tracking links. =)

 

Title: How to Track Links When You Can't Use Analytics

Dear Lifehacker, I'm trying to track my links, but I don't know how. How can I see when each of them was clicked? Sincerely, Curious About Stats Dear Curious About Stats, Tracking your links is important for a number of reasons. Maybe you're trying to measure the effectiveness of an ad campaign; maybe you're checking up on sales from one link or another; or maybe you want to check that nobody's going around and spamming your links with no-follow tags everywhere. Whatever the case may be, there are a few ways to go about tracking those clicks—and we've outlined a few below! While Google does offer a way to track this information in Analytics, it's not great—especially if you're using a link shortener (like bit.ly, for example). If that describes your situation, read on!

 

Shorten the article summaries with some sort of relevant keyword so readers can review what was said without having to re-read it all.

Keywords: Google Analytics, link tracking, how-to guide.

 

***Please do not copy/paste this article verbatim. The material is copyrighted and should be treated as such. Thank you!*** =) *****

While this information points to the best ways to track your links if you can't use Analytics, it's important to note that there are limitations on what Analytics tracks. For instance, it will only tell you when a visitor clicks once—not multiple times in succession. It also doesn't register click depth (i.e., how many pages the people who clicked went to). Of course, if they're following through with a purchase or some other action that ties into your goals, that's still valuable information—you just need to use a tool that tracks that information (like Google AdWords).

 

Shortening links is valuable in and of itself—but how do you know people are clicking them?

Good news! Some URL shorteners let you track those links, too. =) There are a few ways these links tend to be tracked:

- Embeddable widgets for your site

- Analytics integration

- A / click page

While this information points to the best ways to track your links if you can't use Analytics, it's important to note that there are limitations on what Analytics tracks. For instance, it will only tell you when a visitor clicks once—not multiple times in succession. It also doesn't register click depth (i.e., how many pages the people who clicked went to). Of course, if they're following through with a purchase or some other action that ties into your goals, that's still valuable information—you just need to use a tool that tracks that information (like Google AdWords).

 

Shortened URLs are valuable for sharing content because they take up less space than full-length URLs and often look nicer in print. Plus, they help protect against link rot—the phenomenon by which links become unusable after the target page changes location. However, you may not know whether anyone is clicking those shortened URLs unless you use tracking tools like widgets or Analytics integrations so you can view stats on clicks and see how well your campaign is doing over time. For example, use Google AdWords to track the number of conversions for your shortened URLs (in this case, purchases) and compare that to overall clicks on your advertisements.

Shortened URLs are valuable for sharing content because they take up less space than full-length URLs and often look nicer in print. Plus, they help protect against link rot—the phenomenon by which links become unusable after the target page changes location. However, you may not know whether anyone is clicking those shortened URLs unless you use tracking tools like widgets or Analytics integrations so you can view stats on clicks and see how well your campaign is doing over time. For example, use Google AdWords to track the number of conversions for your shortened URLs (in this case, purchases) and compare that to overall clicks on your advertisements.

 

Shortened URLs are valuable for sharing content because they take up less space than full-length URLs and often look nicer in print. Plus, they help protect against link rot—the phenomenon by which links become unusable after the target page changes location. However, you may not know whether anyone is clicking those shortened URLs unless you use tracking tools like widgets or Analytics integrations so you can view stats on clicks and see how well your campaign is doing over time. For example, use Google AdWords to track the number of conversions for your shortened URLs (in this case, purchases) and compare that to overall clicks on your advertisements.

Shortened URLs are valuable for sharing content because they take up less space than full-length URLs and often look nicer in print. Plus, they help protect against link rot—the phenomenon by which links become unusable after the target page changes location. However, you may not know whether anyone is clicking those shortened URLs unless you use tracking tools like widgets or Analytics integrations so you can view stats on clicks and see how well your campaign is doing over time. For example, use Google AdWords to track the number of conversions for your shortened URLs (in this case, purchases) and compare that to overall clicks on your advertisements.

Shortened URLs are valuable for sharing content because they take up less space than full-length URLs often look nicer in print. Plus, they help protect against link rot—the phenomenon by which links become unusable after the target page changes location. However, you may not know whether anyone is clicking those shortened URLs unless you use tracking tools like widgets or Analytics integrations so you can view stats on clicks and see how well your campaign is doing over time. For example, use Google AdWords to track the number of conversions for your shortened URLs (in this case, purchases) and compare that to overall clicks on your advertisements.

Shortened URLs are valuable for sharing content because they take up less space than full-length URLs and often look nicer in print. Plus, they help protect against link rot—the phenomenon by which links become unusable after the target page changes location. However, you may not know whether anyone is clicking those shortened URLs unless you use tracking tools like widgets or Analytics integrations so you can view stats on clicks and see how well your campaign is doing over time. For example, use Google AdWords to track the number of conversions for your shortened URLs (in this case, purchases) and compare that to overall clicks on your advertisements.

Shortened URLs are valuable for sharing content because they take up less space than full-length URLs and often look nicer in print. Plus, they help protect against link rot—the phenomenon by which links become unusable after the target page changes location. However, you may not know whether anyone is clicking those shortened URLs unless you tracking tools like widgets or Analytics integ

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