Shorter > longer # matchurl

Shorter > longer # matchurl

06.Oct.2021

Long URLs are, generally speaking, less than ideal. You don't need to take this to the extreme, and if your URL is already less than 50-60 characters, don't worry about it at all. But if you have URLs pushing 100+ characters, there's probably an opportunity to rewrite them and gain value. 

This isn't a direct problem with Google or Bing—the search engines can process long URLs without much trouble. The issue, instead, lies with usability and user experience. Shorter URLs are easier to parse, to copy and paste, to share on social media , and embed , and while these might all add up to only a fraction of a second in web performance time gained, that's still something worth considering.

 

 

Social media presents the biggest opportunity to gain from a shorter URL. While you can already shorten URLs using Google's goo.gl service, it might be worth your while to learn what options are out there in terms of social media site-specific shorteners. For example, Twitter allows you to create custom URLs when tweeting from your web site from its Cards interface, and when somebody clicks on that shortened link in their mobile or desktop timeline, they'll be taken through a redirect so the original link remains intact.

 

URL shortening services like Bitly add additional tracking metrics for each shortened URL, which could help inform your organic marketing efforts going forward. And if you're using Google Analytics for Web Traffic reporting , then it doesn't matter what medium you use to get traffic to your site; it all gets added up and reported in the same bucket.

 

While you might be able to see and copy and paste a longer URL, that doesn't mean it's easier for your user to engage with. If you think about why somebody would want to engage with your content or product at all, then motivation will drive their actions more than anything else, making them much more likely to choose the "shorter" option if one is available.

 

Just because shorter URLs are better doesn't mean you need to resort only to using three-letter URL shorteners—take advantage of whatever opportunities may come up within the context of your business model. One recent trend has been social media participation with shortened links on sites like Twitter, but if you're selling products or recruiting employees, then LinkedIn might be a good place for that instead of Facebook.

But don't just stop at thinking about your own site—consider the context surrounding whatever content you're trying to get people to engage with. If it's an event, are there ways to promote sharing of session information on mobile devices? What about promoting sponsorship opportunities through website ads ? Everyone has tried Google AdWords marketing by now, but have you spent any time browsing through LinkedIn Sponsored Content options lately?

The main takeaway is this: URLs are part of how users share and distribute your content online , so give them what they want!

Shorter > longer

 

URL Shorteners are useful for social media sharing. They're also useful for measuring analytics, and even for making money through pay-per-click advertising. The main takeaway is that you should think about how people will share your content before writing it, so you can make the most of the first impression it makes on them. This means whether or not to use a URL shortener depends mostly on where they'll be shared. If participants in an event are encouraged to tweet session information, then Twitter's custom links are probably best suited to that task than Google AdWords' neatly shortened URLs would be. Similarly, if somebody wants to promote their job opening via LinkedIn , then Sponsored Content with its clickable URL is clearly better than trying to fit a link into the text of a status update.

Shorter > longer

 

Web Performance Time gained from using short URLs is minimal, but don't let that stop you from using them! The main takeaway is to think about how users share your content before writing it, so you can make the most of the first impression it makes on them. This means whether or not to use a URL shortener depends mostly on where they'll be shared. If participants in an event are encouraged to tweet session information, then Twitter's custom links are probably best suited to that task than Google AdWords' neatly shortened URLs would be. Similarly, if somebody wants to promote their job opening via LinkedIn , then Sponsored Content with its clickable URL is clearly better than trying to fit a link into the text of a status update.

Shorter > longer

 

If you want to add in an image, go ahead and add it right below here. Just make sure that it's not taller than 500px or wider than 1000px when displayed on this page. And please, pretty please with sugar on top: Add captions to the images if at all possible. It makes them more accessible and will improve your search engine results! (This is counterintuitive and we understand why you might be tempted to leave off captions;

Long URLs are, generally speaking, less than ideal. You don't need to take this to the extreme, and if your URL is already less than 50-60 characters, don't worry about it at all. But if you have URLs pushing 100+ characters, there's probably an opportunity to rewrite them and gain value.

This isn't a direct problem with Google or Bing—the search engines can process long URLs without much trouble. The issue, instead, lies with usability and user experience. Shorter URLs are easier to parse, to copy and paste, to share on social media , and embed , and while these might all add up to only a fraction of a second in web performance time gained, that's still something worth considering.

 

 

Social media presents the biggest opportunity to gain from a shorter URL. While you can already shorten URLs using Google's goo.gl service, it might be worth your while to learn what options are out there in terms of social media site-specific shorteners. For example, Twitter allows you to create custom URLs when tweeting from your web site from its Cards interface, and when somebody clicks on that shortened link in their mobile or desktop timeline, they'll be taken through a redirect so the original link remains intact.

 

URL shortening services like Bitly add additional tracking metrics for each shortened URL, which could help inform your organic marketing efforts going forward. And if you're using Google Analytics for Web Traffic reporting , then it doesn't matter what medium you use to get traffic to your site; it all gets added up and reported in the same bucket.

 

While you might be able to see and copy and paste a longer URL, that doesn't mean it's easier for your user to engage with. If you think about why somebody would want to engage with your content or product at all, then motivation will drive their actions more than anything else, making them much more likely to choose the "shorter" option if one is available.

 

Just because shorter URLs are better doesn't mean you need to resort only to using three-letter URL shorteners—take advantage of whatever opportunities may come up within the context of your business model. One recent trend has been social media participation with shortened links on sites like Twitter, but if you're selling products or recruiting employees, then LinkedIn might be a good place for that instead of Facebook.

But don't just stop at thinking about your own site—consider the context surrounding whatever content you're trying to get people to engage with. If it's an event, are there ways to promote sharing of session information on mobile devices? What about promoting sponsorship opportunities through website ads ? Everyone has tried Google AdWords marketing by now, but have you spent any time browsing through LinkedIn Sponsored Content options lately?

The main takeaway is this: URLs are part of how users share and distribute your content online , so give them what they want!

Shorter > longer

 

URL Shorteners are useful for social media sharing. They're also useful for measuring analytics, and even for making money through pay-per-click advertising. The main takeaway is that you should think about how people will share your content before writing it, so you can make the most of the first impression it makes on them. This means whether or not to use a URL shortener depends mostly on where they'll be shared. If participants in an event are encouraged to tweet session information, then Twitter's custom links are probably best suited to that task than Google AdWords' neatly shortened URLs would be. Similarly, if somebody wants to promote their job opening via LinkedIn , then Sponsored Content with its clickable URL is clearly better than trying to fit a link into the text of a status update.

Shorter > longer

 

Web Performance Time gained from using short URLs is minimal, but don't let that stop you from using them! The main takeaway is to think about how users share your content before writing it, so you can make the most of the first impression it makes on them. This means whether or not to use a URL shortener depends mostly on where they'll be shared. If participants in an event are encouraged to tweet session information, then Twitter's custom links are probably best suited to that task than Google AdWords' neatly shortened URLs would be. Similarly, if somebody wants to promote their job opening via LinkedIn , then Sponsored Content with its clickable URL is clearly better than trying to fit a link into the text of a status update.

Shorter > longer

 

If you want to add in an image, go ahead and add it right below here. Just make sure that it's not taller than 500px or wider than 1000px when displayed on this page. And please, pretty please with sugar on top: Add captions to the images if at all possible. It makes them more accessible and will improve your search engine results! (This is counterintuitive and we understand why you might be tempted to leave off captions; we used to do that too!) Also, if you think your page could benefit from some extra whitespace around it, try out our Float Page

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