Shorter links are more memorable

Shorter links are more memorable

13.Sep.2021

Did you ever wonder why some links are so much shorter than others? We know the Internet is semantic, but let’s pick on Twitter.

Twitter has some restrictions for its t.co shortlinks (i.e., not having certain characters like spaces). But if I type in bit.ly/j8W4vr8 without breaking a sweat, what do you think will happen next?

 

You guessed right—that link will take me to this article on Lifehacker! It knows that because of how bitly works (registration required). So Twitter gets all the credit (or blame) for using t.co URLs, but they’re actually powered by bitly under the hoods through their industry-defining APIs.

So why are some links shorter than others? The simple answer is because they’re more memorable. If you find a link cumbersome to remember, it might be because the service/platform doesn’t have an API linking that text phrase to its destination URL. So if I tweet “Twitter updates @twitterapi about new features | bit.ly/updateTW,” it will actually take me to this article on TechCrunch (they also use bitly). But so would bit.ly/updateTW even if Twitter used t.co URLs!

That brings up another question: how does using or not using t.co affect my Bitlinks? Since t.co is powered byly, all your bitlinks will be available with both t.co and bitly’s service, but you can also create an unlimited number of aliases (like we used updateTW above) for free on top of the 40+ pre-made ones like facebook, instagram, pinterest, etc.

So what makes a shortlink “good?” It would depend on your goal. If it’s to make content like this more searchable and easier to share, then any string of text will do as long as there’s no ampersand (&), apostrophe (‘), less than (<), or greater than (>) symbols that might break the intent. So if I use “twitterapi is now bit.ly/updateTW,” that link is still going to take you here even though it has a reserved keyword!

On the other hand, if you're trying to track referrals from social media or have click analytics on your links, then using APIs will give you better insights into where clicks are coming from and how people are using your links.

That said, go ahead and use our shortlinks for sharing content online with friends/followers/co-workers—it is good for them :) They might not know why they’re shorter until now :D You can also create as many aliases as needed for free at bit.ly/create-alias.

 

Shorter links are more memorable. Twitter uses t.co URLs, but they're powered by bitly under the hoods through their industry-defining APIs. The simple answer is because they’re more memorable. If you find a link cumbersome to remember, it might be because the service/platform doesn’t have an API linking that text phrase to its destination URL. So if I tweet “Twitter updates @twitterapi about new features | bit.ly/updateTW,” it will actually take me to this article on TechCrunch (they also use bitly). On the other hand, if you're trying to track referrals from social media or have click analytics on your links, then using APIs will give you better insights into where clicks are coming from and how people are using your links. If it’s to make content like this more searchable and easier to share, then any string of text will do as long as there’s no ampersand (&), apostrophe (‘), less than (<), or greater than (>) symbols that might break the intent. So if I use “twitterapi is now bit.ly/updateTW,” that link is still going to take you here even though it has a reserved keyword!

 

If you're trying to track referrals from social media or have click analytics on your links, then using APIs will give you better insights into where clicks are coming from and how people are using your links. If it’s to make content like this more searchable and easier to share, then any string of text will do as long as there’s no ampersand (&), apostrophe (‘), less than (<), or greater than (>) symbols that might break the intent. So if I use “twitterapi is now bit.ly/updateTW,” that link is still going to take you here even though it has a reserved keyword!

That said, go ahead and use our shortlinks for sharing content online with friends/followers/co-workers—it is good for them :) They might not know why they’re shorter until now :D You can also create as many aliases as needed for free at bit.ly/create-alias. That brings up another question: how does using or not using t.co affect my Bitlinks? Since t.co is powered byly, all your bitlinks will be available with both t.co and bitly’s service, but you can also create an unlimited number of aliases (like we used updateTW above) for free on top of the 40+ pre-made ones like facebook, instagram, pinterest, etc.

 

What makes a shortlink "good?" It would depend on your goal. If it's to make content like this more searchable and easier to share, then any string of text will do as long as there # ra

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