Short URLs allow you to get the most out of character limits on social media

Short URLs allow you to get the most out of character limits on social media

13.Sep.2021

Twitter has a strict character limit of 280, so keeping posts concise is key. Shortened URLs give you that much more room for that poignant observation about politics, or the perfect punctuating emoji for your killer joke about hot dogs. 

## To see your custom URL click "customize" below this article !

Thanks to services like bitly and goo.gl, you can take extremely long URLs and shrink them down to something manageable. That way, if you tweet about your latest article at Lifehacker.com , instead of including the entire URL (which usually looks like this: http://lifehacker.com/5820762/ ), you can use a much shorter address that redirects to that link (like this: http://bit.ly/2bB6zRF ). This comes in handy when tweeting links on platforms like Twitter, where the character limit is incredibly strict. Rather than having an unusually short word count for your comment or observation, or worse -- having to leave out words all together -- short URLs make it easy to get your point across in fewer characters.

## Click "customize" below this article !

Short URLs also come in handy for texting friends. Instead of sharing an abnormally long link through your text messages, you can use a short, customized URL so it doesn't take up half the screen on someone's phone. They'll thank you later. Additionally, if you're on Facebook or another platform that truncates links with unnecessary characters (like an ellipsis), shortened URLs will give you more room to share whatever piece of content you want, without having to worry about it being chopped off after just a few words. It's not just social media that benefits from using shortened URLs -- they can help any time you need to send someone a link.

## To see your custom URL click "customize" below this article !

For example, if you're using Slack (if you aren't, what are you waiting for?), having a shortened link in the channel will save space and keep things looking clean. It's also useful if you want to send someone an email or put up a tweet that links to something, but doesn't reveal the whole thing right away. Sometimes it's nice letting people discover things on their own -- or at least have them click through to see the rest of it. If all these reasons haven't convinced you already, shortened URLs can reduce the amount of spam people post on public forums and social media channels, since they won't be able to fit as much nonsense into the link itself.

Instead of arguing whether or not you should shorten your long URLs, learn how to do it yourself! Here's how:

## To see your custom URL click "customize" below this article !

* Shorten the URL with bitly (bit.ly/2bB6zRF) or goo.gl (goo.gl/H32GkY), which are free services run by Google and Twitter respectively * Keep the shortened version handy for tweeting, messaging, emailing, etc. And remember -- don't use these links for spamming!

## To see your custom URL click "customize" below this article !

Original Article Text:    When you have something to say, you want the most room possible to get your point across. Shortened URLs give you that much more room for that poignant observation about politics, or the perfect punctuating emoji for your killer joke about hot dogs.  To see your custom URL click "customize" below this article!  Thanks to services like bitly and goo.gl, you can take extremely long URLs and shrink them down to something manageable. That way, if you tweet about your latest article at Lifehacker (<a href="http://lifehacker.com/">Lifehacker</a>).com , instead of including the entire URL (which usually looks like this: ), you can use a much shorter address that redirects to that link (like this: http://bit.ly/2bB6zRF ). This comes in handy when tweeting links on platforms like Twitter, where the character limit is incredibly strict. Rather than having an unusually short word count for your comment or observation, or worse -- having to leave out words all together -- short URLs make it easy to get your point across in fewer characters.  Shortened URLs also come in handy for texting friends. Instead of sharing an abnormally long link through your text messages, you can use a short, customized URL so it doesn't take up half the screen on someone's phone. They'll thank you later! It's also useful if you want to send someone an email or put up a tweet that links to something, but doesn't reveal the whole thing right away. Sometimes it's nice letting people discover things on their own -- or at least have them click through to see the rest of it. If all these reasons haven't convinced you already, shortened URLs can reduce the amount of spam people post on public forums and social media channels, since they won't be able to fit as much nonsense into the link itself.

To see your custom link click "customize" below this article!

  For example, if you're using Slack (if you aren't, what are you waiting for?), having a shortened link in the channel will save space and keep things looking clean. It's also useful if you want to send someone an email or put up a tweet that links to something, but doesn't reveal the whole thing right away. Sometimes it's nice letting people discover things on their own -- or at least have them click through to see the rest of it. If all these reasons haven't convinced you already, shortened URLs can reduce the amount of spam people post on public forums and social media channels, since they won't be able to fit as much nonsense into the link itself.

Instead of arguing whether or not you should shorten your long URLs, learn how to do it yourself! Here's how:

 

* Keep the shortened version handy for tweeting, messaging, emailing, etc. And remember -- don't use these links for spamming!

Instead of arguing whether or not you should shorten your long URLs, learn how to do it yourself! Here's how:

* Shorten the URL with bitly (bit.ly/2bB6zRF) or goo.gl (goo.gl/H32GkY), which are free services run by Google and Twitter respectively * Keep the shortened version handy for tweeting, messaging, emailing, etc. And remember -- don't use these

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