Reduce Your Website

Reduce Your Website

11.Oct.2021

Keeping your site optimized to load quickly is one of the best things you can do for both your web traffic and search engine optimization efforts. It's easy to get bogged down with plug-ins, widgets, moving elements around, changing graphics - pretty much any change you make has a potential negative impact on how long it takes for your content to load up. 

 

The sometimes painful process of optimizing your website’s speed could be worth it too because Google themselves have stated that 53% of mobile audiences leave websites if they take more than three seconds to load. Their time is valuable so don’t encourage them to bounce with a slow-as-molasses website. You can analyze your site's speed with Google PageSpeed Insights, Google’s Test My Site or Pingdom. These tools offer detailed information on how you can best improve your website's load time. This includes replacing images or scripts that might be taking a while to load.

If you’re using WordPress, you’ll want to remove any plug-ins that aren’t critical to your site. You should also simplify any menus and don’t go too crazy with widgets unless they are directly related to the content on the page (e.g., Twitter).

 

The greatest impact on web performance is made by reducing the number of HTTP requests required for loading your page elements (e.g., images, style sheets, etc.). Combine multiple CSS files, JavaScript files and image files into as few HTTP requests as possible.

If you’re using a content delivery network (CDN) such as Amazon CloudFront, CDN77 or Edgecast, make sure to enable compression on your server side to decrease file size and load time. You can combine these strategies with optimizations like domain sharding and leveraging browser caching to speed up site performance without sacrificing anything in the way of page content (i.e., no images will be removed from your site).

Just make sure not to go too overboard with all of these things – especially if you want users to stay on your website long enough for it to fully load! [ARTICLE END]

 

This article is about making sure your website loads quickly.

53 percent of mobile audiences leave websites if they take more than three seconds to load. Make sure you optimize your site so that it does not take that long for it to load, or else you can lose potential visitors. You should also combine multiple CSS files, JavaScript files and image files into as few HTTP requests as possible to decrease file size and load time. If you are using a CDN - such as Amazon CloudFront, CDN77 or Edgecast - make sure to enable compression on your server side so that file size decreases and speed increases. Do not go overboard with all of these strategies because then the page might not fully load! Remember: Your web traffic could decrease if people think your site is too slow.

 

 

According to Google's market research, 53 percent of mobile audiences leave a site if it takes more than three seconds to load. Their time is valuable, so don't encourage them to bounce with a slow-as-molasses website.

 

You can analyze your site's speed with Google PageSpeed Insights, Google’s Test My Site or Pingdom. These tools offer detailed information on how you can best improve your website's load time. This includes replacing images or scripts that might be taking a while to load.

If you’re using WordPress, you’ll want to remove any plug-ins that aren’t critical to your site. You should also simplify any menus and don’t go too crazy with widgets unless they are directly related to the content on the page (e.g., Twitter).

The greatest impact on web performance is made by reducing the number of HTTP requests required for loading your page elements (e.g., images, style sheets, etc.). Combine multiple CSS files, JavaScript files and image files into as few HTTP requests as possible.

If you’re using a content delivery network (CDN) such as Amazon CloudFront, CDN77 or Edgecast, make sure to enable compression on your server side to decrease file size and load time. You can combine these strategies with optimizations like domain sharding and leveraging browser caching to speed up site performance without sacrificing anything in the way of page content (i.e., no images will be removed from your site).

Just make sure not to go too overboard with all of these things – especially if you want users to stay on your website long enough for it to fully load! This article is about making sure your website loads quickly. 53 percent of mobile audiences leave websites if they take more than three seconds to load. Make sure you optimize your site so that it does not take that long for it to load, or else you can lose potential visitors. You should also combine multiple CSS files, JavaScript files and image files into as few HTTP requests as possible to decrease file size and load time. If you are using a CDN - such as Amazon CloudFront, CDN77 or Edgecast - make sure to enable compression on your server side so that file size decreases and speed increases. Do not go overboard with all of these strategies because then the page might not fully load! Remember: Your web traffic could decrease if people think your site is too slow.

 

According to Google's market research, 53 percent of mobile audiences leave a site if it takes more than three seconds to load. Their time is valuable, so don't encourage to bounce with a slow-as-molasses website.

You can analyze your site's speed with Google PageSpeed Insights, Google’s Test My Site or Pingdom. These tools offer detailed information on how you can best improve your website's load time. This includes replacing images or scripts that might be taking a while to load.

If you’re using WordPress, you’ll want to remove any plug-ins that aren’t critical to your site. You should also simplify any menus and don't go too crazy with widgets unless they are directly related to the content on the page (e.g., Twitter).

The greatest impact on web performance is made by reducing the number of HTTP requests required for loading your page elements (e

We are social