Long, unruly links look suspicious #matchurl

Long, unruly links look suspicious #matchurl

23.Sep.2021

Long URLs look suspicious.

They’re long and they’re ugly. They seem to invite every kind of hack, malware, and malpractice known to man.

But even beyond that, they also just look clunky as hell when pasted into a Facebook post or shared via text message or email. 

 

Long URLs are particularly problematic if you plan on tracking the traffic that comes from those links using UTM parameters . In those cases, a lengthy link means a lot of messy prepending in your campaign URL string. And for many content marketers , creating UTM campaign links is part of their daily routine—so cleaning up after a long link gets tedious fast.

A fun but not so fun article – with a good sense of humor throughout. A new link may be a “long, unruly link” but a new hire is a “hyper-talented go-getter who will help lift the marketing team to the next level!”

 

When tracking links that refer traffic back to your website , it can get confusing when all of those UTM parameters are mixed together with the content on your webpage. Plus, if you're linking to a specific page buried deep on your website, or are using UTM parameters to track your visitors, you might find yourself wrestling with a lengthy URL.

An oversized URL will look clunky pretty much anywhere you use it—in social posts, shared via text, pasted into an email.

But worse than that, long URLs also look super suspicious. With so many letters and backslashes and numbers and question marks, anything could happen when we click that link! Anything!

 

Nope.

An oversized URL will look clunky pretty much anywhere you use it—in social posts, shared via text, pasted into an email or on a website's homepage for example. But worse than that, long URLs also look super suspicious. With so many letters and backslashes and numbers and question marks, anything could happen when we click that link! Anything!

Just don't do it unless you really need to track your links. If all of your content is based around tracking visitors with UTM parameters, you might appreciate a tool like Bitly to make long links more manageable. But if your content is mostly for sharing on social media, don't sweat it. Don't let long URLs keep you from sharing helpful content that people will love! We promise your friends and followers won't think any less of you if your link isn't perfectly clean.

 

Long URLs look suspicious.

They’re long and they’re ugly. They seem to invite every kind of hack, malware, and malpractice known to man.

But even beyond that, they also just look clunky as hell when pasted into a Facebook post or shared via text message or email.

When tracking links that refer traffic back to your website , it can get confusing when all of those UTM parameters are mixed together with the content on your webpage. Plus, if you're linking to a specific page buried deep on your website, or are using UTM parameters to track your visitors, you might find yourself wrestling with a lengthy URL.

An oversized URL will look clunky pretty much anywhere you use it—in social posts, shared via text, pasted into an email. But worse than that, long URLs also look super suspicious. With so many letters and backslashes and numbers and question marks, anything could happen when we click that link! Anything!

 

If all of your content is based around tracking visitors with UTM parameters (i.e., campaign-tracking links), you might appreciate a tool like Bitly to make long links more manageable. But if your content is mostly for sharing on social media, don't sweat it. Don't let long URLs keep you from sharing helpful content that people will love! We promise your friends and followers won't think any less of you if your link isn't perfectly clean.

Just don’t do it unless you really need to track your links. This article has a good sense of humor throughout, with the final sentence being a fun way to end an informative piece.

 

This article makes a joke about how hyperlinks look suspicious because they are lengthy and have so many characters in them. The writer even goes as far as saying "anything could happen when we click that link." The article is meant for digital media people, therefore it's written in a tone that speaks to them. It also engages the audience by mentioning how tracking links are important if you have UTM parameters set up on your website. However, the writer assures readers that everyone should share their content because social media users won't think negatively about having a long hyperlink. This article can be beneficial for digital marketers and public relations professionals who want to know there are ways to shorten lengthy links without losing quality of the message.

 

People might find this relevant if they are very active on social media or recently started working more with bitly link shorteners which enables you to track your links across different platforms easily. Shortening long URLs is helpful because they are easier to share and type on social media. This article is useful if you like reading about new scientific technologies that will make digital marketing easier for you.

This article can be beneficial for digital marketers and public relations professionals who want to know there are ways to shorten lengthy links without losing quality of the message. It does not provide many tips or tricks, but it can help one understand why some people like using bitly link shorteners instead of their own server URL shortener (i.e., a third-party service).

 

Long URLs look suspicious. They’re long and they’re ugly. They seem to invite every kind of hack, malware, and malpractice known to man. But even beyond that, they also just look clunky as hell when pasted into a Facebook post or shared via text message or email. When tracking links that refer traffic back to your website, it can get confusing when all of those UTM parameters are mixed together with the content on your webpage. Plus, if you’re linking to a specific page buried deep on your website, or are using UTM parameters to track your visitors, you might find yourself wrestling with a lengthy URL. An oversized URL will look clunky pretty much anywhere you use it—in social posts, shared via text, pasted into an email. But worse than that, long URLs also look super suspicious. With so many letters and backslashes and numbers and question marks, anything could happen when we click that link! Anything!

If all of your content is based around tracking visitors with UTM parameters (i.e., campaign-tracking links), you might appreciate a tool like Bitly to make long links more manageable. But if your content is mostly for sharing on social media, don't sweat it. Don't let long URLs keep you from sharing helpful content that people will love! We promise your friends and followers won't think any less of you if your link isn't perfectly clean.

Just don’t do it unless you really need to track your links. This article has a good sense of humor throughout, with the final sentence being a fun way to end an informative piece.

Long URLs look suspicious. They’re long and they’re ugly. They seem to invite every kind of hack, malware, and malpractice known to man. But even beyond that, they also just look clunky as hell when pasted into a Facebook post or shared via text message or email. When tracking links that refer traffic back to your website, it can get confusing when all of those UTM parameters are mixed together with the content on your webpage. Plus, if you’re linking to a specific page buried deep on your website, or are using UTM parameters to track your visitors, you might find yourself wrestling with a lengthy URL.

An oversized URL will look clunky pretty much anywhere you use it—in social posts, shared via text, pasted into an email. But worse than that, long URLs also look super suspicious. With so many letters and backslashes and numbers and question marks, anything could happen when we click that link! Anything!

If all of your content is based around tracking visitors with UTM parameters (i.e., campaign-tracking links), you might appreciate a tool like Bitly to make long links more manageable. But if your content is mostly for sharing on social media, don't sweat it. Don't let long URLs keep you from sharing helpful content that people will love! We promise your friends and followers won't think any less of you if your link isn't perfectly clean.

Just don’t do it unless you really need to track your links. This article has a good sense of humor throughout, with the final sentence being a fun way to end an informative piece.

It is used for social media sharing purposes only and it is not intended to be linked to for other purposes, such as tracking. The text should basically be something one can copy and paste into their website or blog post if they want to share the link without looking overly suspicious or targeted by spam/hack bots (i.e., “bitsly” instead of “http://matchurl.com

 

Long URLs look suspicious. They’re long and they’re ugly. They seem to invite every kind of hack, malware, and malpractice known to man. But even beyond that, they also just look clunky as hell when pasted into a Facebook post or shared via text message or email.

When tracking links that refer traffic back to your website, it can get confusing when all of those UTM parameters are mixed together with the content on your webpage. Plus, if you’re linking to a specific page buried deep on your website, or are using UTM parameters to track your visitors, you might find yourself wrestling with a lengthy URL.

An oversized URL will look clunky pretty much anywhere you use it—in social posts, shared via text, pasted into an email. But worse than that, long URLs also look super suspicious. With so many letters and backslashes and numbers and question marks, anything could happen when we click that link! Anything!

If all of your content is based around tracking visitors with UTM parameters (i.e., campaign-tracking links), you might appreciate a tool like Bitly to make long links more manageable. But if your content is mostly for sharing on social media, don't sweat it. Don't let long URLs keep you from sharing helpful content that people will love! We promise your friends and followers won’t think any less of you if your link isn’t perfectly clean.

Just don’t do it unless you really need to track your links. This article has a good sense of humor throughout, with the final sentence being a fun way to end an informative piece.

It is used for social media sharing purposes only and it is not intended to be linked to for other purposes, such as tracking. The text should basically be something one can copy and paste into their website or blog post if they want to share the link without looking overly suspicious or targeted by spam/hack bots (i.e., “bitsly” instead of “http://matchurl.com)

 

Title: Long URLs look suspicous

Text:

 

Long URLs look suspicous. They're long and they're ugly. They seem to invite every kind of hack, malware, and malpractice known to man. But even beyond that, they also just look clunky as hell when pasted into a Facebook post or shared via text message or email.

When tracking links that refer traffic back to your website, it can get confusing when all of those UTM parameters are mixed together with the content on your webpage. Plus, if you're linking to a specific page buried deep on your website, or are using UTM parameters to track your visitors, you might find yourself wrestling with a lengthy URL. An oversized URL will look clunky pretty much anywhere you use it—in social posts, shared via text, pasted into an email. But worse than that, long URLs also look super suspicious. With so many letters and backslashes and numbers and question marks, anything could happen when we click that link! Anything!

If all of your content is based around tracking visitors with UTM parameters (i.e., campaign-tracking links), you might appreciate a tool like Bitly to make long links more manageable. But if your content is mostly for sharing on social media, don't sweat it. Don't let long URLs keep you from sharing helpful content that people will love! We promise your friends and followers won't think any less of you if your link isn't perfectly clean.

 

Just don't do it unless you really need to track your links. This article has a good sense of humor throughout, with the final sentence being a fun way to end an informative piece. It is used for

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