How specificity helps you with metrics

How specificity helps you with metrics

14.Sep.2021

URL shorteners provide you with metrics about your content. They tell you how many people click on each short URL that you share, so you know what content is getting the most engagement and what's falling flat.

You want to share more content that people value and less that people don't.

Not all clicks are created equal. As someone who creates and shares content, you have a few goals:

To deliver value to your consumers and cement your brand position.

To establish your company or yourself as an expert in your market: an authoritative source.

To grow your consumer audience.

Using unique URLs helps every one of these efforts by leading to greater transparency into how engaged consumers are with each piece of shared content, which helps you better engage consumers by promoting the content they value.

 

Unique URLs also help you track which of your own marketing efforts are generating leads and sales for your business, so you can invest more in what works and less in what doesn't. This is a much clearer way to measure success than using vanity metrics like likes and shares that don't give you as much information about how people are interacting with your own site, which helps you focus on building one-to-one relationships with those who find you valuable.

One example: Facebook promoted posts only let you use a URL shortener if it's not an HTTPS address. When someone clicks on such a shortened link through another browser tab or window (e.g., because they came from Twitter), they would see a warning message, telling them that they might be at risk and should proceed with caution. This might make them less likely to continue reading the content.

 

Using long URLs (or even worse: short URLs that take users directly to your homepage) leads to these problems:

People won't click on your links if they're not sure what they'll get when they land. They'll think you're insecure or want to trick them into clicking something else altogether - like an affiliate link to a competitor's site.

Shortened URLs often don't contain enough information about the destination page. It can be hard for consumers to tell whether a certain article will meet their needs just from the title and preview image, so using a URL shortener that doesn't share enough information about the post will cause readers not to click.

You don't know how many people are clicking on your links, so you can't see if they're reaching their targets or not. You won't know whether your lead generation campaign is successful at all unless you track each link through its own unique URL, so you can compare it to other metrics like conversions and sales.

Unique URLs help every one of these efforts by leading to greater transparency into how engaged consumers are with each piece of shared content, which helps you better engage consumers by promoting the content they value. Sharing long URLs also helps you track which of your marketing efforts are generating leads and sales for your business, so you can invest more in what works and less in what doesn't. This is a much clearer way to measure success than using vanity metrics like likes and shares that don't give you as much information about how people are interacting with your own site, which helps you focus on building one-to-one relationships with those who find you valuable.

One example: Facebook promoted posts only let you use a URL shortener if it's not an HTTPS address. When someone clicks on such a shortened link through another browser tab or window (e.g., because they came from Twitter), they would see a warning message, telling them that they might be at risk and should proceed with caution. This might make them less likely to continue reading the content.

 

Using long URLs (or even worse: short URLs that take users directly to your homepage) leads to these problems:

People won't click on your links if they're not sure what they'll get when they land. They'll think you're insecure or want to trick them into clicking something else altogether - like an affiliate link to a competitor's site.

Shortened URLs often don't contain enough information about the destination page. It can be hard for consumers to tell whether a certain article will meet their needs just from the title and preview image, so using a URL shortener that doesn't share enough information about the post will cause readers not to click.

You don't know how many people are clicking on your links, so you don't know if they're reaching their targets or not. You won't know whether your lead generation campaign is successful at all unless you track each link through its own unique URL, so you can compare it to other metrics like conversions and sales.

Unique URLs help every one of these efforts by leading to greater transparency into how engaged consumers are with each piece of shared content, which helps you better engage consumers by promoting the content they value. Sharing long URLs also helps you track which of your marketing efforts are generating leads and sales for your business (so that you can invest more in what works and less in what doesn't), which is a much clearer way to measure success than using vanity metrics like likes and shares that don't give you as much information about how people are interacting with your own site, which helps you focus on building one-to-one relationships with those who find you valuable.

One example: Facebook promoted posts only let you use a URL shortener if it's not an HTTPS address. When someone clicks on such a shortened link through another browser tab or window (e.g., because they came from Twitter), they would see a warning message, telling them that they might be at risk and should proceed with caution. This might make them less likely to continue reading the content..

Using long URLs (or even worse: short URLs that take users directly to your homepage) leads to these problems:

People won't click on your links if they're not sure what they get when they land. They think you're insecure or want to trick them into clicking something else altogether - like an affiliate link to a competitor's site.

Short URLs don't contain enough information about the destination page. It can be hard for consumers to tell whether a certain article will meet their needs just from the title and preview image, so using a URL shortener that doesn't share enough information about the post will cause readers not to click..

You don't know how many people are clicking on your links, so you don't know if they reach their targets or not. You won't know whether your lead generation campaign is successful at all unless you track each link through its own unique URL, so you can compare it to other metrics like conversions and sales..

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