How do URL shorteners work?

How do URL shorteners work?

13.Sep.2021

URL shorteners work by creating a redirect to your long URL.

 

To use a URL shortener, you enter the long URL into the website and click shorten. That will create a shorter version of the URL which is sent back to your browser as an HTTP response. This short URL can be copied and pasted elsewhere (for example, in an email) and when it is clicked, all that happens is for this new HTTP request to go through – just like any other link – but this time with only the final destination being displayed instead of going through the steps of redirecting through a third party site first.  

 

The new shortened or "vanity" URL may look something like this https://tinyurl.com/y8f88sj5 .

 

URL shorteners are most popularly used to link to or share content that is too long for a simple hyperlink, but not so long as to require an elaborate explanation of how it will be found. For example, if you were tweeting about a new scientific paper published in Nature Genetics, the body of your tweet would likely be limited to 140 characters or less. A URL that links directly into the text of the paper would get cut off mid-sentence and become difficult to click on because it isn't very visible due to its length. In this instance, a URL shortener might create a shorter version of the URL https://www.nature.com/nrg/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nrg.2012.232.html that would allow you to tweet the link with ease, while still providing enough information for your followers to find the article in full on its own.

 

There are a few different types of redirect HTTP response codes, but look for ones that use a 301 permanent redirect: the other varieties may hurt your SEO ranking.

 

URL shorteners work by creating a redirect to your long URL. Entering a URL into your internet browser sends an HTTP request to the web server to pull up a specific website. The long and the short URLs are both simply different starting points for an internet browser to get the same destination. There are a few different types of redirect HTTP response codes, but look for ones that use a 301 permanent redirect: the other varieties may hurt your SEO ranking. You might also be interested in how do link shorteners work? These are similar websites, running off of the same basic concept, where instead of just creating short links they try to create longer ones by chaining together multiple URLs.

 

URL shorteners are most popularly used to link to or share content that is too long for a simple hyperlink, but not so long as to require an elaborate explanation of how it will be found. For example, if you were tweeting about a new scientific paper published in Nature Genetics, the body of your tweet would likely be limited to 140 characters or less. A URL that links directly into the text of the paper would get cut off mid-sentence and become difficult to click on because it isn't very visible due to its length. In this instance, a URL shortener might create a shorter version of the URL https://www.nature.com/nrg/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nrg.2012.232.html that would allow you to tweet the link with ease, while still providing enough information for your followers to find the article in full on its own. There are a few different types of redirect HTTP response codes, but look for ones that use a 301 permanent redirect: the other varieties may hurt your SEO ranking.

 

To use a URL shortener, you enter your long URL into the web application and it redirects you to a short version of the URL. The next time somebody clicks on your short link, all that happens is this new HTTP request to go through – just like any other link – but this time with only the final destination being displayed instead of going through the steps of redirecting through a third party site first. You might also be interested in how do link shorteners work? These are similar websites, running off of the same basic concept, where instead of just creating short links they try to create longer ones by chaining together multiple URLs.

 

URL shorteners are most popularly used to link to or share content that is too long for a simple hyperlink, but not so long as to require an elaborate explanation of how it will be found. For example, if you were tweeting about a new scientific paper published in Nature Genetics, the body of your tweet would likely be limited to 140 characters or less. A URL that links directly into the text of the paper would get cut off mid-sentence and become difficult to click on because it isn't very visible due to its length. In this instance, a URL shortener might create a shorter version of the URL https://www.nature.com/nrg/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nrg.2012.232.html that would allow you to tweet the link with ease, while still providing enough information for followers to find the article in full on its own. You might also be interested in how do link shorteners work? These are similar websites, running off of the same basic concept, where instead of just creating short links they try to create longer ones by chaining together multiple URLs.

The main benefit that URL shorteners offer is mostly for convenience while sharing long URLs on social media. It saves time and space when you don't have to spell out a long web address or copy/paste it into your tweet; furthermore, it will even shorten the length of any text-based posts onto other social arenas like Facebook or Google+, thus freeing up more space for adding commentary. There are a few different types of redirect HTTP response codes, but look for ones that use a 301 permanent redirect: the other varieties may hurt your SEO ranking.

 

URL shorteners are most popularly used to link to or share content that is too long for a simple hyperlink, but not so long as to require an elaborate explanation of how it will be found. For example, if you were tweeting about a new scientific paper published in Nature Genetics, the body of your tweet would likely be limited to 140 characters or less. A URL that links directly into the text of the paper would get cut off mid-sentence and become difficult to click on because it isn't very visible due to its length. In this instance, a URL shortener might create a shorter version of the URL https://www.nature.com/nrg/

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