Automated URL shortening service from T.co

Automated URL shortening service from T.co

10.Oct.2021

Twitter has started an automated link shortening service using their T.co domain as a base. This is similar to what such services as bit.ly and others currently offer, but made official by Twitter themselves.

 

The new service will help users keep track of links shared on the site and also allows third party applications to include shortened URLs in Tweets without running into any character limit issues. The company previously used TinyURL for this purpose and it is not yet clear whether they plan to phase out this practice entirely or continue offering both services side by side.

 

TinyURL had been criticized during its use by the microblogging site due to its lack of support for custom URL aliases, which are displayed when sharing content through Twitter's website or API, and the fact that links automatically redirected to a long-winded user-maintained URL which was hard to remember. These issues have been solved by T.co with a straightforward "This link can be found at t.co/" statement shown before the clickable part of the shortened link.

 

While this will help users easily track where content comes from, it does raise concerns for anonymity online as it allows Twitter to see your browsing history through any links you send via their website or API. This could potentially lead to censorship if they choose to ban or limit certain links should they deem them illegal in any way.

 

The new system has already gone live earlier today and is currently available both desktop and mobile versions of Twitter.

 

Twitter has started an automated link shortening service using their T.co domain as a base. This is similar to what such services as bit.ly and others currently offer, but made official by Twitter themselves. The new service will help users keep track of links shared on the site and also allows third party applications to include shortened URLs in Tweets without running into any character limit issues. While this will help users easily track where content comes from, it does raise concerns for anonymity online as it allows Twitter to see your browsing history through any links you send via their website or API. This could potentially lead to censorship if they choose to ban or limit certain links should they deem them illegal in any way.

The new system has already gone live earlier today and is currently available both desktop and mobile versions of Twitter.

 

The new service will help users keep track of links shared on the site and also allows third party applications to include shortened URLs in Tweets without running into any character limit issues. The company previously used TinyURL for this purpose and it is not yet clear whether they plan to phase out this practice entirely or continue offering both services side by side. While this will helpful, it does raise concerns for anonymity online as it allows Twitter to see your browsing history through any links you send via their website or API. This could potentially lead to censorship if they choose to ban or limit certain links should they deem them illegal in any way.

The new system has already gone live earlier today and is currently available both desktop and mobile versions of Twitter.

 

Twitter has started an automated link shortening service using their T.co domain as a base. This is similar to what such services as bit.ly and others currently offer, but made official by Twitter themselves. The new service will help users keep track of links shared on the site and also allows third party applications to include shortened URLs in Tweets without running into any character limit issues. While this will helpful, it does raise concerns for anonymity online as it allows Twitter to see your browsing history through any links you send via their website or API. This could potentially lead to censorship if they choose to ban or limit certain links should they deem them illegal in any way. The new system has already gone live earlier today and is currently available both desktop and mobile versions of Twitter.

 

The new service will help users keep track of links shared on the site and also allows third party applications to include shortened URLs in Tweets without running into any character limit issues. The company previously used TinyURL for this purpose and it is not yet clear whether they plan to phase out this practice entirely or continue offering both services side by side. While this will helpful, it does raise concerns for anonymity online as it allows Twitter to see your browsing history through any links you send via their website or API. This could potentially lead to censorship if they choose to ban or limit certain links should they deem them illegal in any way. The new system has already gone live earlier today and is currently available both desktop and mobile versions of Twitter.

Review:The new service will help users keep track of links shared on the site and also allows third party applications to include shortened URLs in Tweets without running into any character limit issues. The company previously used TinyURL for this purpose and it is not yet clear whether they plan to phase out this practice entirely or continue offering both services side by side. While this will helpful, it does raise concerns for anonymity online as it allows Twitter to see your browsing history through any links you send via their website or API. This could potentially lead to censorship if they choose to ban or limit certain links should they deem them illegal in any way. The new system has already gone live earlier today and is currently available both desktop and mobile versions of Twitter.

Review:The new service will help users keep track of links shared on the site and also allows third party applications to include shortened URLs in Tweets without running into any character limit issues. The company previously used TinyURL for this purpose and it is not yet clear whether they plan to phase out this practice entirely or continue offering both services side by side. While this will helpful, it does raise concerns for anonymity online as it allows Twitter to see your browsing history through any links you send via their website or API. This could potentially lead to censorship if they choose to ban or limit certain links should they deem them illegal in any way. The new system has already gone live earlier today and is currently available both desktop and mobile versions of Twitter.

 

We are social