7 Tips for Creating a Good URL Structure

7 Tips for Creating a Good URL Structure

19.Sep.2021

Here are a few good ways to make sure you use your URLs wisely:

1. Use relevant keywords

If you want search engines and visitors to use the same keywords, make it clear in your URLs what they’re about. Instead of having a structure like directory/categories/monthly-deals , try something like categories / december - monthly - deals - for - validateset . It’s more descriptive, making it easier for both humans and search engines to understand.

2. Include “clues” in your URLs that indicate their placement in an information hierarchy or category system

For example: sales-items / page24 / news instead of sales - items .

3. Avoid using session IDs , tracking codes, or other URL variables

This makes it harder for search engines to crawl your site, so even if you have the best possible keywords, they’ll be useless. Your URLs should ideally read as “real” web addresses.

4. Use hyphens instead of underscores in your URLs

Hyphens are much easier for people to type into their browsers than underscores (and spaces), and search engines place more importance on words separated by hyphens than they do with underscore characters .

5. Make sure all the information is relevant throughout each page's lifetime (this includes <title> tags)

6. Keep important text like primary navigation items within the visible portion of a browser window  i.e., don't make them scrollable

7. Minimize the number of files and directories, as this reduces the likelihood of a browser making 50-60 requests to load all your markup. More requests mean more time spent waiting for each page to be completely rendered before it's shown to a visitor.

For example: welcome / news instead of welcome_and_news .

It’s much better if you use a descriptive URL, one that people will recognize as being relevant to the content. This also helps with search engine optimization by letting both humans and crawlers quickly identify what type of content is on the page. As Google now penalizes thin content, this article from Harris Consulting Group can provide further information about why it’s important not to skimp on content.

 

1) Use relevant keywords If you want search engines and visitors to use the same keywords, make it clear in your URLs what they’re about. Instead of having a structure like directory/categories/monthly-deals , try something like categories / december - monthly - deals - for - validateset . It’s more descriptive, making it easier for both humans and search engines to understand. 2) Include “clues” in your URLs that indicate their placement in an information hierarchy or category system For example: sales-items / page24 / news instead of sales - items . 3) Avoid using session IDs , tracking codes, or other URL variables This makes it harder for search engines to crawl your site, so even if you have the best possible keywords, they’ll be useless. Your URLs should ideally read as “real” web addresses. 4) Use hyphens instead of underscores in your URLs Hyphens are much easier for people to type into their browsers than underscores (and spaces), and search engines place more importance on words separated by hyphens than they do with underscore characters . 5) Make sure all the information is relevant throughout each page's lifetime (this includes <title> tags) 6) Keep important text like primary navigation items within the visible portion of a browser window i.e., don't make them scrollable 7) Minimize the number of and directories, as this reduces the likelihood of a browser making 50-60 requests to load all your markup. More requests mean more time spent waiting for each page to be completely rendered before it's shown to a visitor. For example: welcome / news instead of welcome_and_news .

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